Replacements

The Replacements: The Complete Studio Albums (1981–1990)

If you missed the Replacements during their career—as did most people, to judge by their tepid record sales—here’s your chance to nab a crash course in the pioneering Minneapolis alt-rock outfit. As the title promises, this box collects all eight of their original studio LPs. Nothing for All, a 1997 collection of B-sides and non-album…

Guitar Heroes

Nine New Winners

I focus most of my reviews on the albums that will be of the widest interest, which generally means well-known artists. However, I also want to direct attention to some of the less-prominent performers who seem deserving of the spotlight. Here are capsule reviews of new albums from some of the ones who’ve impressed me…

aquashowdebig

Elliott Murphy: Aquashow Deconstructed

Elliott Murphy caused quite a stir with Aquashow, his 1973 debut album. Rolling Stone, for example, devoted considerably more space to its review of the record than to a critique of Springsteen’s first album in the same issue, with writer Paul Nelson calling the LP “magic” and labeling its final track “one of the must…

The Miami Years (Bee Gees 1974–1979)

Bee Gees: Bee Gees 1974–1979

The Bee Gees had quite a run in the late 60s and early 70s, when they scored nearly a dozen memorable pop hits, among them “To Love Somebody,” “Words,” “I’ve Gotta Get a Message to You,” “I Started a Joke,” “Lonely Days” and the chart-topping “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart.” As it turned…

Mayall's Bluesbreakers

John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers: Live in ’67

If you’re a serious Fleetwood Mac fan, you’re undoubtedly familiar with the early 1970s version of the group—the one that gave us albums like Bare Trees and Heroes Are Hard to Find before Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham came aboard and helped turn them into superstars. You may also know of the even earlier version…